C3West: Blacktown Native Institution Artist Camp #1 Highlights

C3West: Blacktown Native Institution Artist Camp #1 Highlights

November 8, 2019 0 By Kody Olson


[music playing] Western Sydney is growing,
growing, growing by the minute and I’ll tell you this: let me just say this, that I reckon that they would have their eye on this site here So we’ve gotta act and we’ve gotta protect this land, y’know? Legally it’s still not ours I just
want to make sure that we know that and to cover our arses too because you know a lot of us put in a lot of work and then later down the track find – bang! It doesn’t go back to us. We have here today Blacktown Council and what used to be Landcom which is now Urban Growth NSW and the Museum of Contemporary Art, all working together to try and progress, well… Working together with you to try and implement your future, your
dreams for the site. We’ve got three things that we want to work with: the community and
the artist and our partners and other Aboriginal historians and stuff
we’re going to be bringing in. We’ve been talking about, with the plan of management is that we want to move to a forum where the Darug can manage the site – – and we’ve come up with a beautiful plan of a building up here, a women’s meeting place over here, men’s meeting place over there, a children’s meeting place here where the men and the women can see the children at all times. And down the back here we had bush tucker. I mean that was approved once by Landcom, then it was chopped. And maybe your group can make this happen in the future because it’s such a pity this didn’t happen. Can I do a face? Done! This session is about looking at the history of the site and I know a lot of you know a lot – a bit of
information about this site or you’ve heard things, but I just think it’s good if we all sort of listen to some of the other more historical facts around it. I know I know a little bit but I don’t know lots of stuff so it’d be really good. And I have been connecting the stories of this place to contemporary living histories that people are talking about and are living and bringing with themselves. Why the Maori’s were brought over here was to do the farming for the white men. That’s all it was. The Maori war chief were brought out here, they were taken to Tasmania, put on Maria Island and that’s where they all died. 1823 Maria married Robert Locke, the first integrated marriage between an
Aboriginal and a whitefella. As St John’s got the cathedral in Parramatta in 1824, Maria was first given land grants out here of 30 acres. And the land… Maria wasn’t just given the grants. She fought all the way to get them. Forget about the white man’s book, about the white history in Western Sydney. Read the oral history: the true facts from the Darug people’s stories. Because you’ve got all the
different landowners and different people who were on
the Aboriginal Protection Board who actually had hundreds of acres and so you know,
conflict of interest basically that’s what was going on. Hey guys, you’re sitting here in the OB van with Eliza Delaney and Uncle Greg Simms. I’m just about to give him an interview and I just wanted to say welcome, Uncle. Welcome to you. Right back back in the Dreamtime when everything was first made and Biaime had made all the flowers
and all the shrubs, trees and he made the bottlebrush. Well, I’m Darug, I’m Boorooberongal people, so my mob comes from out
on the Hawkesbury River. Their lives are deadly! This morning we’ll be talking about
the future of the site. I’m going to hand it over to Michael
to have a bit of a chat about his association with the
site first and then we’ll talk about the inspirational stuff later. My first life expectations of employment, that is that I was fit enough to be a farm labourer had started in our family back to this site. This is the place where it was believed that Aboriginal people were good enough to be farm labourers and domestic servants. And they’ve got a habit of saying, “Oh you’re too white to be black.” Y’know, and the thing is no matter how much milk we put in our coffee it’s still coffee.
-That’s right! I would like to see a greater sense of unity amongst our own mob,
amongst Darug people. We need to stop the infighting and we all say that, but it sort of continues on one way or another. It is all happening and that’s I think, therefore, you know, let’s move forward. We’ve got another interim committee meeting on the fourth of December – [singing and music]
Walk with you, walk with me. January. [singing and music]
Strong! Smart! Deadly!