A Day in the Life: Boston University Student

A Day in the Life: Boston University Student

October 9, 2019 35 By Kody Olson


(electronic dance music) – Hi, I’m Stephanie. I am a senior here at Boston University. I’m majoring in Computer Science with a minor in Statistics and Dance. Outside of class, I’m the president of our
Dance Theatre Group here which is the largest
dance group on campus. I’m involved in a sorority here as well and just kind of hang out with friends and see Boston in general. So a typical day in my life here at BU would be I would wake
up around eight a.m., make some breakfast, eat it, go to class at around 11 or noon. I have class pretty much the whole day, grab some lunch in the
middle of that at the GSU. Then I’d probably eat
some dinner afterwards and then head to a rehearsal
from seven to nine-ish. Get back to my dorm room, study hard away, and then, go to bed at
around midnight or so, and do it all again the next day. – Tell me a little bit
about your major at BU. – Yeah, so I major in Computer Science. There’s five different groups of classes that you have to take. The first three are just like your general requirements for CS, so like Intro to
Programming, Data Structures, Algorithms, things like that, and then, from there, there’s
a lot of different tracks of different elective courses that you can take going onward. – Have you decided which
path you’re gonna go down? – So it’s not, so you don’t have to actually choose your concentration in order to do Computer Science. So I haven’t picked a specific one. I’ve kind of been going into
more like computer graphics and linear algebra and that
type of route as of now, but, and software development on the side, so we’ll see. – [Interviewer] How would you describe the academic culture at BU generally? Is it competitive? Is it cooperative? – At first, it’s definitely competitive, so like the general requirement
courses at the beginning, when you first start, they’re
really large, you know? It’s like pretty competitive. There’s like curves that work towards the way that the class is structured. So like if a lot of people
do really well, then, and a few don’t do that well, then obviously, that will hurt your score, but I definitely think
once you get past like, the first competitive aspect, it’s very, very open. All the professors have office hours, and if you go to office hours, you’ll find that they’re,
like, extremely really helpful, and they really do care, but I think it’s just about
making the extra effort at the beginning. – Gotcha, so you also have minors, is that correct?
– Yeah. – So tell me about those. – So I have a Statistics minor, which is just six extra
courses of statistics. That kinda just came about
because I took statistics classes and then really like it
and had space for it, so why not?
– Right. – And then, I also have my Dance minor, which is 20 extra credits. It’s like six dance classes, and then, some history and aesthetics. Academic dance classes as well. – Gotcha, so how do you
see all of this sorta playing into, like, your
future career goals? – Statistics and CS definitely
go hand-in-hand, I think. Definitely going towards
like a data science, things like that, data analytics. Those types of fields
are definitely things that I’m very interested in. As far as dance, I think it’s
just something that I knew that I was gonna keep
up throughout undergrad, and so, why not get a minor in it if I’m gonna be spending all
that time doing it anyways? – So what initially drew
you to computer science and statistics? – Computer science, I actually, so I came into BU undecided. – Okay.
– I came in. I didn’t really know what I wanted to do. I thought maybe, like,
International Relations, just because that program’s
really strong here, and then, I actually did a
summer course in South Africa, which was web development,
and that really drew me to it, and then, I came back here and I actually met a lot of CS students that were really passionate
about what they were doing, and that just made me want to
be a Computer Science major. As far as Statistics, my dad
is actually a statistician. – Gotcha.
– So I think I definitely took that
class kind of as like a, an ode to my dad, but I think I just, I really have enjoyed how
they work hand-in-hand, and also, just, I think, just data, I think, drives so much of today’s world, and I think that’s really interesting and something I want to
keep, continue on in. – [Interviewer] Right. So what are extracurriculars like at BU? – There’s a lot of them. So we actually have
this thing called SPLASH at the beginning of the semester, and all the different clubs go on campus into Nickerson Field,
like the soccer field, and all the freshmen come, and they basically just like, frantically sign up for
a bunch of email lists of things that they
might be interested in. I think we have, like, over 200 clubs. – Oh, geez.
– We have so many different things, you have
– Right. – like, so if you, if there’s
something you wanna do, you can find it instantly, and I think once you’re
in an extracurricular, it’s really easy to like
become more involved and like really build your
community through that. – So what has your extracurricular journey at BU looked like? – So I actually joined the
dance extracurricular group right when I came here, and then, within, like, a
year, I was on the E-Board, and since I’ve been president
for two years now of it, so it’s very like driven into one group, and I think, just because I found like, the thing that I loved, the extracurricular
that I loved instantly, but I also know so many
other people that have like, joined, like, five
different groups at one time and then, like, kind of
veered off into one or two that they really found passion within, but yeah, mine specifically
has been pretty great. It’s been like where my best
friends have become, come from, just because we spend so much
time together doing things, but yeah. – So tell me more about your group. – So we’re the largest
dance group on campus. We perform in a semesterly show. We have student choreograph pieces, so basically, how it
works is you’ll, like, audition for someone’s specific piece, rehearse weekly at the same
time for a couple hours, and then, we put on a fully,
like, professional show. We work with a lighting designer to figure out things for our dances. We have three faculty advisors that kind of advise us through
the choreographic process, so we actually meet with them three times throughout the semester, just checking up with our
pieces and things like that. Yeah, it’s really great, and we also have different
master classes every single week from different professionals
throughout the community of all different genres of dance. – So you have also studied abroad at BU? Well, I guess away from BU. – [Stephanie] Yeah (giggles). – Tell me about that. – Yeah, so I studied abroad last fall in New Zealand, in Auckland. It was wonderful. I got to do an internship there actually. It was at a, yeah, biotech company, and they were all really,
really dope people, and it was just like a
really great environment. New Zealand is definitely
different from Boston. It’s like way more relaxed, I feel like. – Mm-hmm.
– So it’s nice to, like, be in nature and
get to hike all the time and explore, like, a
completely different country. – Right.
– Yeah. I miss New Zealand. – Very neat, do a lot of
BU students study abroad? – Yeah, a huge amount have studied abroad. I think, like, the majority
of my friends studied abroad because we have so many
different programs. Like, a really common
one is going to London for communication and things like that, but we have, I think,
in over 40 countries, we have different programs. – [Interviewer] So how
do you balance, like, extracurriculars with a
pretty big academic load? – I think it just all
comes down to prioritizing and really, time management. Most of the people I know at BU are involved in
extracurriculars and academia mostly because they got into BU because they were both
involved in academia and extracurriculars in high school, so I think just continuing that on, but it’s definitely, it’s
definitely hard sometimes because the workload
of college is different and not something that you’re
used to in high school, but I think just like really prioritizing what needs to be done on a certain day and like, actually sitting down, and when you’re sitting down,
focusing on what you’re doing instead of being distracted. So these are the Student Villages. This is Student Village 1. This is where I live. They’re really, really
nice apartment buildings. I live in a single with
three other roommates, so we have a kitchen and a common area. – Why did you decide to come to BU? – I think the first
thing that drew me to BU was definitely being in Boston, first of all, was the biggest aspect, and then, the second part was just all the different
opportunities for, like, traveling and, like, the size of it. Even though it’s still a public,
er, a private university, there’s still a lot of students and a lot of, like,
clubs and opportunities, and especially the study
abroad program, I think, attracted me the most out
of anything specifically, just to have the opportunity
to study abroad for a semester and have so many options. I think there’s like
40 different countries that students can actually travel to. – And what surprised you the most about BU when you got here? – I think just kind of
like the independent vibe but also kind of the bubble
that we have created here. So definitely coming to college here, obviously, you’re completely independent. You’re in Boston, which is
a very different environment from where I went to high school, but at the same time, there’s
definitely still a community, and like, all those communities
are formed within BU, which I was really surprised about, and I wasn’t really
expecting to be able to find such tight-knit communities within BU. – So what advice would you have for like, maybe like a younger version of yourself or somebody else who’s
considering applying to BU or college more broadly
but isn’t like really sure how to go about the process? – The most important thing is just, like, really paying attention
to your application just because I do think it’s important, especially like your essays, and really, like, reading
your essays out loud and trying to hear your own voice because you are, like, yes, it’s hard to kind of get past the fact that you’re a number through a system, but at the same time, you
wanna, like, figure out how you can portray yourself
through these numbers. Like, someone’s only seeing you on paper, but you want to be able to see, er, you want to be able
to show them who you are through all of these essays
and papers and external things. – [Interviewer] So what did
you write your essay about? – So the prompt, the common
app essay prompt that I used was describe an environment
that you feel, like, safe in, something similar to that, and I kind of just wrote about my family and this special tradition that we had, kind of tying in, like,
what I do with my family and how all my roots of, like, being an Asian-American
woman come back to me and also how that involves, er, how that comes into all
of the different activities that I did in high school and how that brought me to like, do leadership positions
and things like that and highlighting all the
different activities that I did. If you liked this video and wanna learn more about top colleges, like and subscribe below.